A Match Made In Heaven: When Bread Meets Cheese- Part One


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Pao de Queijo- Brazil

Usually served at breakfast, this cheese-flavored roll is crispy on the outside and very chewy on the inside. Parmesan is often the cheese of choice in which this roll is made with for a delicious hit of cheese.

Cuñapé- Bolivia

The crispy outside of this Bolivian treat contrasts so well with the soft, cheesy inside. The key ingredients to this delicious bread are either cassava or tapioca flour inside of all-purpose flour that most people use.

Smørrebrød- Denmark

In the U.S, people often call a “Danish” something that consists of sweet cheese and pastry but traditionally in Copenhagen, a Danish is a delicious piece of rye bread which is coated in meats and butter with smoked or pickled fish as well as sliced cheeses.

Banerov Hatz- Armenia

This is a delicious combination of cheese and onions which are spread over a thin piece of dough which looks quite like a pizza. Some might say that it resembles an Alsatian Tarte Flambee.

Panino- Italy

Nobody combines bread and cheese better than Italy! This grilled cheese sandwich is known as Panino and dates back to Milanese sandwich bars called Pani note Che from the 1970s. It can often contain salads and of course, delicious melted cheese.

Paneer Paratha- India

This famous cheese “Paneer” of India is used in this Indian delicacy which is paired with unleavened bread “Paratha”. These two pairs up and get filled with spiced and are fried and served at breakfast or on it’s on for a light meal.

Beer And Cheese Soda Bread- Ireland

Since the Irish love beer and sharp cheese, it is no surprise that their contribution to this list is beer and cheese soda bread. There is no yeast in the soda bread but there are beer and cheese, which is good enough for us. Some people even add bacon to the mix, what could be better?

Toastie- England

For toasties, cheddar cheese is the selected cheese for this English delicacy. It is pretty much England’s version of the grilled cheese from the U.S. However, the difference between toastie’s and grilled cheese is that the toastie is buttered on the inside and is toasted.

Rasgulla- Bangladesh

These little bread balls are sweet and spongy which are served throughout Indian subcultures in Southeast Asia, Bangladesh in particular. Rasgullas are usually made with an Indian cottage cheese known as ‘Chhena’. They are also made with semolina dough and light syrup. People often eat them as a dessert.

Pan de Bono- Colombia

Very similar to a Colombian bagel, Pan de Bono is usually paired with a hot chocolate. It is made out of cornmeal, question, egg, starch and feta cheese.

Lángos- Hungary

Fried bread is one of the most popular street foods in Hungary. However, the sour cream and melted shredded cheese on top make it a lot more savory. A lot of the time, vendors will add other toppings to it or stuff them with requested ingredients.

Flammkuchen- Germany

Flammkuchen translates to flame cake and is quite similar to pizza. Its thin dough is topped with onions, pork, and soft cheese. It is then cooked in a wood-fired oven to create the perfect combination of gooey, crispy cheese bread.

Tiropsomo- Greece

This perfect combination created by Greeks is feta and bread which is best served warm. It is usually served with dinner, however, leftovers can be reheated to accompany breakfast.

Croque Monsieur- France

Despite this sandwich not being able to exist without the ham, it still is best known for its cheese as well. The French cheese is similar to Gruyere with its nutty flavor which is placed in between two slices of bread and topped with nutmeg. It is then baked, broiled and served.

Khachapuri- Georgia

This popular snack is eaten instead of pizza in Georgia. It is made with sugar, dry yeast, flour, salt, and olive oil. It is topped with lots of butter, eggs and feta cheese and a melty cheese. Yum!

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This entry was posted in Cheese, Cheese Facts, Cheese history, Cheese Recipes, Cheese Use, The Shisler's Family, Traditions and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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